What are Teen Driving Contracts, and Should You Have Your Teen Sign One?

With driving becoming more and more dangerous, it is important that parents are using all the resources that are available to help protect their teen driver and encourage them to practice safe driving. In 2015, approximately 235,845 teens between the ages of 16-19 were treated in emergency departments for the injuries they suffered in an auto accident, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). And the truth is, teens are more vulnerable to the risks the roadways present as they are still learning the basics of driving. 

While parents are constantly reiterating to their teens that they should never speed, drive distracted, and should always watch out for other inattentive drivers, sometimes that might not be enough. Perhaps there are other useful resources out there that can help support your ability to keep your teen driver safe. One resource we recently came across that might be beneficial to you and your teen is a teen driving contract. This contract that both you and your teen would sign highlights the guidelines, expectations, and goals, for when your child is driving and of course, the consequences they would face when they breach the terms of the contact. 

To make life easier for you, the AAA has already created a teen driving contact template ready to be used although you can modify it to your liking. This contract contains two important parts, both of which we will break down a bit more in detail for you. 

Part One of the Teen Driving Contract- Driving Conditions 

There will be four checkpoints and for each, you will outline your teen’s privileges which will include: 

  • The time they are permitted to drive when it gets dark outside. For instance, you might require them to be home when the sun goes down or at 9:00 p.m.
  • Whether they are permitted to have teen passengers in the vehicle with them.
  • What types of weather conditions they can drive in.
  • What roadway types they can drive on, i.e. highways, neighborhood, local, etc. 

You will also set a timeframe for each of these checkpoints along with a review date for when you would revisit it. For instance, the first checkpoint might last for the first three months after your teen receives their driver’s license. After your teen satisfies all the requirements stipulated in the first checkpoint, then you would come back and create another checkpoint along with the period you want it to last.  

Part Two of the Teen Driving Contract: Driving Rules and Privileges 

Some of the rules that are already established in the contract state that your teen must: 

  1. Check with a parent every time they are out driving.
  2. Obey all traffic signs and laws.
  3. Avoid taking any sort of unnecessary risk while driving. 

In the event your teen violates any of the terms of the contract, they will be subjected to losing their driving privileges for the period of time you decide on. 

Now, if you would like to access the contract that has already been created and begin implementing it with your teen, you can do so now by clicking here. Although most teens are aware of the behavior they are expected to exhibit each and every time they drive, having a contract with the rules written out will only help to make them clearer. And when your teen knows exactly what consequences they are going to be faced with should they violate any of the rules, it might help them to think twice before engaging in any inappropriate behavior. And that, in turn, could save their life. 

As much as effort as parents put into protecting their teens while driving, unfortunately, not always can they prevent an accident from occurring. And if you or your teen were recently injured in a vehicular accident, contact Columbus, OH personal injury lawyer E. Ray Critchett. Our firm will work to protect your legal rights and help you collect any compensation you are due for the damages sustained. 

You can contact E. Ray Critchett, LLC. at: 

1071 S. High Street

Columbus, OH 43206

740-282-5393


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